Doing the Work: If Most of the Time You Don’t Because It’s not “Good Enough”

FeaturedDoing the Work: If Most of the Time You Don’t Because It’s not “Good Enough”

I am a solid millennial.

When people complain and complain about the millennial generation I know if they’re being accurate based on just how much shame I am feeling about the topic at hand. I’m not on the border. I’m not kind of an x-er or really of a different category. I fit the bill. Guilty.

Oh, also I own a house, have 3 kids, and paid off my student debt years ago. Not that you have to have done those things to be a millennial, I’m just pointing out a place where the stereotype doesn’t hold up.

It doesn’t. Because I am solidly a millennial, I promise you. I love avocado toast. For reals. I mean have you HAD avocado toast?

But more than the avocado toast, I grew up thinking several things.

1. It was imperative that I be happy in whatever I was doing.
2. The world is broken and it is legitimately a thing I need to be directly fixing in my actual life.
3. I personally need to change the world in some way to have mattered.
4. I tend not to have automatic respect for my elders. I mean if it seems earned ok. But if I think I’m more skilled, I’m not good at waiting in line. So as far as those “kids these days” lines go, that one is true for me.
5. If all of the above did not make it clear, my expectations for life are a tad unrealistic.

But I was so sure I could be the one to actually do it! And unfortunately, I did well enough in school that my ego was not particularly deflated by the time that I left HS.

In college, I did just as well! But when I approached the finish line and no one was handing me the reigns to the world or even a job and the economy collapse of 2008 was not promising and turns out I am on occasion too shy for most people to take seriously as a leader of anything unless it is turning in assignments and understanding the minimum work required to get an A without any wasted effort–I started to look around me and all I saw was Illinois.

Whoops.

I spent the last year of my college career in therapy trying to understand where it all went wrong and being pretty sure I had been far too immature to get married and it turns out they don’t test you before they let you do it. (12 Years later we figured things out on the go but it’s a little like laying down tracks in front of a moving train).

So when my husband said he had a potential job offer in Saudi Arabia I laughed and said “You can apply if you know we’re not going.” And then I said with a do not cross me look on my face “because no way on earth are we going to Saudi Arabia.”

And about 3 months later after urine samples and pooping in cups and promising not to convert Muslims and having all our earthly possessions boxed up and shipped the wrong way before finally being shipped the right one we landed in in Jeddah Airport where I felt like I needed to wrap myself up for modesty because though my clothes were modest they were also hot pink and white and it turns out that the dress code for women is pretty strictly BLACK. (Did I mention I like to dress in clothes so bright they might burn your eyes out, especially if you’re one of those people who prefers blacks and neutrals?)

Because it turns out Saudi was hiring and paying when a lot of places in the world simply weren’t. It seemed patriotic at the time to make a lot of money in a Middle Eastern country and then take it all back home to pay off student debt and buy a house, so that’s what we did. And I became something known as a trailing spouse which meant it was actually illegal for me to be employed in our new home and my only job was to hang out while my husband worked.

And after about two weeks of thinking about going nowhere in my career for the next however many jobs I got an illegal job writing copy for the University PR department and they let me name a whole bunch of streets in our new city (they’re still there, the 60 or so names I picked out on bright green signs at the intersections of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology). Of course, after a few Saudis got wise that I was being allowed to do things basically everything else I did was black-balled from then on out and I attempted (and failed) to start social media for the University and attempted to write a University newspaper and failed (4 times mind you) and I attempted (and failed) a great number of other things before I crashed and burned into a hopeless pile of I don’t think I’m going to be changing the world anytime soon and I would settle at this point just to be allowed to change the heading on one stupid article.

So I quit. I quit that job in a flaming hailstorm so boisterous (which involved me crying like a baby in my boss’s office that I had no idea what I was doing in my life and by the way no one has paid me in months and since I’m an illegal immigrant employee complaining about it hasn’t gotten me very far) that 3 other people quit at the same time and invited me to a party to celebrate which is where I finally learned how to get a hair cut in Saudi (they HIDE the salons) and turned down smoking shi sha because it turns out I am still obsessed with that part of me that wants to be SO SO SO good and change the world.

I should have just smoked the freaking Shi Sha.

After that I immediately started sleeping basically all day and staying up all night to play video games and spiraling into an existential tailspin wondering what had become of me. Meanwhile, my husband had undramatically held down a steady good job THIS ENTIRE TIME GUYS. So I started running until I could run a half-marathon. I took kick boxing so I could beat the heck out of whatever I thought was standing in the way of my hopes and dreams. I traveled to Istanbul alone. I got lost in Istanbul alone. I managed to find someone in Istanbul I knew who had a map and found my way to a hostel alone where luckily a very capable friend was waiting so I was no longer alone. I took a road trip in the United States by myself and realized it was the most independent thing I’d ever ever done and wasn’t that sad and wasn’t it awesome anyway? And I took Arabic 3 times a week for two hours until I could speak about as well as a preschooler and at least tell the cabbies confidently to PLEASE SLOW DOWN BEFORE YOU KILL US ALL and then I got a new job which wasn’t as glamorous but at least they let me do things kind of and I could come in at noon and leave at 3 and no one cared so I did.

And then I started having mini panick attacks about how I was basically checking NONE of the to do items on my life list and so I got pregnant with my first kid because at least START A FAMILY was doable for me.

And that is how I had my first child as a result of a way-too-early midlife crisis because I was supposed to be changing the world and I WAS NOT even though from Saudi it was sure easy to let people believe that–because it turns out people start to think a lot of you if you go somewhere they see as dangerous even if where you went is really just full of restaurants and movie theaters and doing just as little as you ever did before but at least you can take the occasional scuba trip and get some nice pictures even though the truth is that your scuba buddy didn’t want to partner up with you anymore than those kids in 5th grade wanted you on their kick ball team and you had to learn what it was like to cry underwater because he went far lower than your license actually allowed you to go and you are still too much of a rule follower and also afraid of popping a lung to follow him.

Weird. It’s really weird. The crying underwater I mean. Probably everything else too, but especially the crying.

So had one kid two kids three kids and then I started this blog and giving people advice not so much because I have so much experience or wisdom but mostly it turns out because I like to give advice. It’s really quite fun but also be really careful who you take advice from–it turns out a lot of us do not know what we are doing. (Have you ever seen the movie 8th grade? Oh my goodness that girl and her video advice.)

And then before I knew it I found myself in a pandemic trying to remote teach (whatever that means) two children while entertaining the other career still un-started with no assurances that there will even be a career TO start before the whole world burns itself down. And murder hornets.

Also, ash is falling from the sky and then snow, and then ash again because apparently my town is stuck between the biggest wildfire Colorado has ever seen and the earliest blizzard Colorado has ever seen and the former is too hot to be put out by the latter.

I’m a millennial. I shot really really high. And every time I’m not happy I am tempted to think that I failed. Even with the paying off my debt and traveling the world and house and kid having. I’m always afraid that I failed. Or maybe that I am still supposed to somehow change the world with my three kids trailing behind and that is EXHAUSTING.

But.

I am changing the world. It’s a fact. I know that about every single person I meet. I see their individual place in the world so easily. I always have. I know just how the puzzle would break without a single person. But I can’t ever seem to look down and see myself. All I ever see is mess and what has to be the MOST exhausting person of life because I won’t stop trying and I won’t stop crying.

Hey, that rhymes.

But that has to apply to me too. And I know, deep down, that raising three boys to become three good men is a world changing thing. And who else could do that but a crazed, crying, trying, street naming, world traveling mom who likes to list of random facts like hamsters eat their young and everyone gets to be an entirely new person every 7 years at the cellular level. It’s a fact.

Maybe if this person doesn’t change the world, the next one will. Or maybe my kids will. Or maybe my stories.

Or maybe, my job was always just to be a normal person living the best life I can and I am not so much an amazing writer or advice giver as someone who adores telling the truth in whatever messy fashion it exists.

That’s not a thing everyone even CAN do let alone WANTS to do, you know. I’m going to write even when it’s not pretty, popular, and my Mom is the only person who ever comments (which is often true, but at least MY MAMA APPRECIATES ME).

And I’m going to be proud of that even if lots of people never wanted to know this much about me. Or maybe only a few people ever read it. Even if I retell the stories a hundred times from a hundred different angles only so that someone else will KNOW without a doubt that their own story isn’t so abnormally messy or weird or broken after all.

You are a piece of the puzzle whether you live to rule kingdoms or just to make sure people get their groceries every day.

It’s a plain fact. If one piece is missing, it almost doesn’t matter what the whole picture is–that piece will dominate your thinking until you’ve looked under every rug and every table and every foot and inside every household register and even behind the bookshelf where it COULD NOT POSSIBLY be (but somehow was).

We need you. I need you. And it’s ok if we’re not happy or even if we’re swimming in anxiety and kids and pandemics and protests and mistakes up to our eyeballs. One person matters forever and always.

That means me. That means you.

So the next 7 years of me I am going to trust that my place matters in the world whether I find the next job, the next adventure, the next world crisis, the next beautiful thought, or just my next good book to read. And so does yours.

I promise.

If You need Help Softening Your Heart: Refusing to Label an Entire group (including Muslims) as Strangers

If You need Help Softening Your Heart: Refusing to Label an Entire group (including Muslims) as Strangers
Cultural conditioning is such an odd thing.

I used to be afraid of Muslims. I just was. I logically understood that blaming an entire religion and culture for the actions of a few was not right, fair, or reasonable, and that this kind of thinking would condemn us all if we were honest. That memory of watching huge buildings on fire, buildings I did not even know existed, in September at 14 years old was burned into my memory. It’s natural to want to blame a whole people. It just is. When faced with fear we have a choice between two things: realizing that anyone anywhere can do something severely evil, and believing that it’s isolated to one group who we can attack and isolate. And it FEELS much better to choose the latter even if it’s not based in reality, because it means the fear is with one people and not all of them.

But logically knowing all of that couldn’t change my heart or prevent the pull of wanting to blame one set of people anyway. It was only by living next to them, in a desperate decision based in poor mental health and loneliness, that I began to really change. And while I can tell lots of stories of meeting Muslim friends in a new country and learning surprising humanizing things about them, it was always the little things that started to undo the fear for real.

It was seeing my coworker who was always dressed very carefully concealing every inch of hair (not all my female coworkers did), in the restroom without her robes to reveal an afro, ripped jeans and suspenders under all that.

It was having constant passive commercials showing things like a mother dressed in Hijab making all the silly over-dramatic faces TV moms always do right before they feed their kid something from a box or a can.

It was watching women dressed in that mysterious garb jump on trampolines on the beach with their kids. Or ride four wheelers. Or eat at Pizza Hut.

It was seeing the men wearing those white robes and red checks carry babies and crack jokes and argue about IKEA furniture with their wives. Experiencing those same men worrying if I’m being treated well and if I feel at home as a foreign woman–even worrying that people were placing conservatism on me that as as an American woman didn’t adhere to. And then, those men wanting to make sure I didn’t have to adhere to it.

It’s living next to people that does it–that softens a heart enough to see the humanity. The similarity. The universality.

They’re not just like me, but they’re SO like me it makes me uncomfortable. Because I should have KNOWN that. Because I knew it but I didn’t KNOW.

It’s a terrible trope that Christian kids come home with after a short-term missions trip. “I went there to help people, but they helped ME. I went there to teach people but they taught ME.”

Really, you’d think we’d stop needing to be taught the hard way that often the very people who we look down upon as people who need saving and changing are the very people who could most save and change us. The fault is never in the needing exposure. We all need exposure to each other to truly understand and stop trying to separate ourselves from each other. It’s the innate belief that we are somehow better or MORE than other cultures and people’s. It isn’t unique to Americans, but it is 100 percent damning and damaging wherever it lives.

Fear and lack of understanding can only be healed by living next to each other. Studies have been done. There is literally no other way to undo fear of people who are culturally separate from us. But arrogance and superiority–that is something that God can heal even without exposure. And it isn’t that he couldn’t heal the former without it if he wanted to–it’s just that I believe living WITH each other IS the manner by which God heals such things. But it requires stepping out in faith. Faith that we aren’t superior. Faith that we must continue to cross divides and do what makes us uncomfortable to pursue God’s ideals.

It would be easy to assert that somehow because I chose to go and confront my fears that I am somehow superior to everyone who hasn’t or doesn’t. But it would be a bold-faced lie. I needed to believe that they were the same as me, because I had spend much of my childhood feeling like an outsider in a town full of insiders where most people only came from THERE. And I went to confront my fears because I was in the middle of a death spiral of depression where doing something exotic, even if it felt terrifying and life-threatening was at least something new. It was impressive and edgy. It felt like it had meaning I could wave under the noses of everyone who I perceived as having rejected me. But things did not happen the way I planned, and I grew as a person in spite of my terrible reasoning for doing something so outside of my comfort zone–because God can and does use everything including our own arrogance and stupidity. Here are several of the things I learned in spite of myself:

I learned that doing something exotic does not do anything to persuade people who see you as an outsider to see you as anything else. Quite the opposite. In fact, in many ways where I only perceived people saw me as outside, weird, or different, I managed to get them to actually thinking me that way (where people thought about me at all). If you’re going to travel somewhere to live with people you do not understand, it will always change you. Not them, not the people you left behind, but you.

All religious people should experience someone trying to convert them with all the zeal and passion of a person who loves you but also doesn’t want you to go to hell. It’s humbling to hear words you thought were exclusive to the wisdom of your own religion coming out of someone else’s mouth, but worried about YOUR soul. It’s embarrassing to discover tracts from a religion you were taught was foreign and evil, and realize that they could represent your own religion, with just a few words changed here and there. And it is humbling to realize someone wants you in heaven THAT BADLY. To watch them pace through all the same award steps, asking you to read their Book, come to their gathering, talk to them about their faith. Even when you don’t convert, and never would, it changes you forever.

You cannot help but be grateful to a people when they show you hospitality, even though you are a stranger in THEIR country. Time and again, when you are not FROM a place, you realize just how vulnerable you are. People could ignore your pleas for help when you don’t know what to do. They could refuse to translate what you did not understand. Refuse to give grace when you do the thing everyone there knows you shouldn’t. They could leave you out and justify it totally. You begin to see this again and again. And again and again you find that people help anyway. People DELIGHT in helping. Even the ones who would seem to be most motivated to be against you. The image of God is unmistakable in every place, no matter what you believe or what they believe.

When you are faced with the choice of doing something illegal as an immigrant that would help your circumstances greatly…you probably do it. I worked illegally in Saudi Arabia for 3 years. People paid me under the table. I was so desperate for something to DO, for the feeling of productivity and contribution. In my case, I was lucky enough to not really have to worry about my ability to live and support myself because my husband did have permission to work. AND I STILL DID NOT CARE. Work gives people dignity. But in any case, the point is not that everyone would do what I did, but that you simply can’t know what you will do in a situation until you are there. I worked illegally for 3 years and I wasn’t even worried about my life, children, or ability to feed myself. If you don’t know me, let me assure you that I am not a person who casually breaks rules. I was the kid who reported it if a teacher gave me a higher grade than I deserved. I always return wallets and phones. I own up to things even when NO ONE CARES.

I began to realize just how scared people were of ME. The news and general information out there about my own religion, country, and culture is not great. Some of it’s wrong–but not all of it. Perspective is such an amazing and unreal thing. I could be mad at the media for misinformation–but how could I be mad at my neighbor who trusted their own media and literally knew nothing else? And how could I be anything but IN AWE when that neighbor chose to show kindness and openness anyway?

My next-door neighbor originally assumed I hated them. He was always polite, always kind. Then I found out that someone had reported his beloved German Shepherd and he’d had to remove it from his home. He assumed it was us out of some vendetta. Luckily, we go the chance to talk when I offered to let him and his wife park in our driveway (they had two cars, we had none). When he found out I wasn’t a dog-hater and didn’t even know he had a dog, he threw the switch to total hospitality so fast it made my head spin. They came over to share food and show us vacation pictures, when our son was born he and his wife went out of their way to get us gifts “American style,” because Saudis just give money. (AND HOLY MAN DID THEY GIVE US GIFTS. THERE IS NOTHING MORE HUMBLING THAN BEING GIFTED SOMETHING BY A SAUDI OR FED BY A SAUDI. LET ME ASSURE YOU AMERICANS DO NOT KNOW HOW TO GIVE GIFTS OR HOSPITALITY LIKE THAT.)

Also, and this lesson doesn’t matter so much, but nothing prepares you for eating at a restaurant that claims to be your own country’s food. Just someone’s else’s interpretation of what pancakes and eggs are supposed to be like is rather revealing about how radical perception and understanding can be when they are shifted just a few degrees. The only people who should make American breakfast are Americans and that is one prejudice I will stick to until I die.

You can’t eat meal after meal next to people you thought of as strange without discovering that they are shockingly familiar. They discuss weekend plans and complain about over-involved mothers. They go outside for smoke breaks and discuss the latest episode of Game of Thrones. They make the same jokes your own Dad makes, just with different politics or religions inserted. They gossip and talk about the weather. It’s hard not to be stupefied as thing after thing you thought came from only your own family, background, culture and country spill out of the mouths of people who dress nothing like you and speak with an accent.

Culture is clothing. It is exterior and shallower than we ever tend think. Humanity is deep, and it is not different from place to place. Living among any people, no matter how different they may seem is revealing: when you go looking for the exotic, often what you find is the totally familiar.

We marginalize the minority, not because we have special rights or conditions, but because that is what humans do everywhere always. Because fear is natural and what we all do.

But I believe we are better. I know we are. I know we can rise above what’s natural and easy.

So listen to music that’s not yours. Watch shows that represent someone different than you. Read books with a perspective that bothers you. Let’s get out of the echo chambers. I’m not asking for change in what you think or believe, only in what you are exposed to. If we passively expose ourself to our neighbors, you’d be surprised how much easier it just becomes to BE neighbors.

And I will never be angry with or scared of someone who asks for such things, who wants the marginalization to stop. Because I want it to stop too. And it’s never as scary as people think it will be. And changing your perspective doesn’t mean losing your beliefs. Often, when we understand other people and beliefs–we understand ourselves better, and what we believe is strengthened.

Fear is a greater enemy than any other set of people ever could be. Don’t let it have you.

If You’ve Been Missing Something: A Morning Car Ride With an Old Friend

If You’ve Been Missing Something: A Morning Car Ride With an Old Friend
Every once in awhile you land in a period of time where for whatever reason, God lands a little extra in your lap in the form of someone else’s need. The kind of need that overwhelms you and all at once makes you hope this means that maybe God thinks you’re competent enough to help out in an important way. (And then you remember, no he doesn’t, no one is, that’s not the point, we’re all hopelessly broken, put down your pride you silly human and just do the thing.)
So I found myself getting up earlier than I usually do, driving across town and sunrise, and giving a much needed car ride.

I kept telling myself, that my grandfather used to get up before the sun to milk cows every morning. A heated car ride at 7 was not in any way something to complain about. A couple of chatty grade schoolers asking me everything from my birthday to my favorite animals were also much better company than cows.

“Mama’s sick, she’ll be better, what’s your favorite month?”

The voice in my head was calling me wimpy for not liking to get up at 6:20 this morning, already oversleeping my alarm by 20 minutes. The voice in my head wondered when the world went to hell in a hand basket and why I insist on being apart of the hell basket. The voice in my head worried that I’d said the lamest things imaginable to my little companions.

The voice in my head.

“Oh hello there,” I thought, finding my way home alone after a cheerful drop off.

“Where on earth have you been? And would you mind whining less?”

I have not had a critical voice as a companion for a very very long time. I think maybe I dropped her off a cliff in a nightmare sometime ago, running ahead of the hoards of scary things chasing me, knowing I did not have space for such dead weight.

I remember it, the dream where I killed her. Or maybe just abandoned her. I looked into her eyes. My eyes. I split a little piece of myself off and threw her into a pit, or maybe a stadium. I can never remember which.

“I have to go now,” she said.

I couldn’t speak as I tearfully threw her in and turned to run as quickly as I could, already longing for her, picturing her body somewhere below the road.

I don’t know why I’ve always thought that. That I intentionally buried or dropped or maybe murdered some piece of myself way back in the early days of my adolescence. That dream. The one after which I never felt quite whole. Never a kid again but not really ever grown up.

There’s one picture of me in particular that reminds me of that murder, or abandonment. It’s a drawing, actually. The assignment was to draw a self portrait. I did it late at night after procrastinating. I didn’t want to do it. Finally I stood in front of the bathroom mirror, balancing my sketch book on the sink edge. I didn’t think about it. I didn’t want to. What came out felt so vulnerable that I glued cartoons around it to soften the way it made me feel. It’s the way my face looks when I drop all pretense. When I’m concentrating instead of trying to make it look like something else. It made me feel like it was obvious something was missing in my natural state. Years later after rescuing it from water damage and lugging it halfway around the world, that look still gets me. I love it and I’m afraid of it.

Every time I see those eyes in my mind I shiver a little. The me I killed. Or maybe just lost. Who is she?

But today I heard the familiar voice. The one that was mad when I had to share my things no matter how new or how nice and I had to bite my tongue if someone broke them. The voice that felt murderous when someone brushed barbie’s hair and then popped her head straight off. The one from the day they killed my favorite trees, and the day they killed the one I decided to love after them.

She’s always known how she felt, and never shied away from critical tid-bits, either at myself or others.

I know people who spend their entire lives running from their critical voice. But I think I’ve been looking for mine, like a child on a milk carton. “Have you seen this girl? If found, she will probably tell you to tuck in your shirt and get a haircut and maybe not to chew so loudly.”

Someone to care about dishes that haven’t been done, or exactly the right way to fold socks. Someone who buys the clothes I actually want in the right size and knows when someone else has been rude. Knows when I’ve been rude. The voice that forced me to give the Sunday school money back that I stole from Ashley Conklin. (I think that was her name.) But also the one who knew that when that kid in fifth grade punched me, he should have been the one to get in trouble, that I didn’t have a big mouth–it was in fact exactly the right size.

And this morning I realized she had found a seat in the car next to me and was staring me down. Chastising me for being wimpier than a dairy farmer. But comfortingly patting my arm as I drove home smiling from my journey. I’d done what I said. I showed up, the ride was given. Such a small thing. Such a good thing.

Do you know what’s worse than having a critical voice? Having one with no power. Having one that doesn’t matter. Having one that got thrown over a cliff sometime ago out of a need to survive. I’ve been making due with resentment and stubbornness masquerading as critique for some time. But those voices could never do her job. It was always about some personal vendetta, or digging in my heels so someone doesn’t make me give what I don’t want to, or what I can’t, or what I don’t have enough of yet again. It turns out absolutely nothing else could do her job.

I’ve missed her so.

So I found myself driving home, noticing what I think is shabby, or out of shape, or missing, or just a little skewed.

What a relief what a relief what a relief.

For when you can notice what is wrong, maybe you finally have a chance to fix it, or even prevent it.

And if she’s back, maybe nothing is chasing me anymore. Maybe anxiety can give way to anger. The good kind. The primary anger that rights what’s wrong with a level head and confidence I often lack.

I drove home from my morning run to sit with my family around a kitchen table eating cereal and drinking coffee. The good kind pressed in a French press. Dare I say, the right kind?

I do this, sometimes. I invent a reason why something that’s been wrong could be right all of a sudden. I epiphanize myself right out of reality. Maybe I’m just telling myself I can grow a critical voice, a voice that cares and understands what is right and wrong, needed, expected, and handles it well. Maybe the fact that I envisioned my critical voice as a child I tossed over a cliff into the shadows a long time ago is crazy. Maybe it’s way too telling. But maybe–maybe if I lost her in a dream, maybe I can find her in one too.

“That’s too much sugar,” she says. “Do you really need that much sugar?”

I smile to myself. Maybe I don’t.